Archive for Bird Nest Farming

Walitein Preparation for Your Swiftlet Farms

Hooray! The WALITEIN DIY video is finally ready! Enjoy!

If you still don’t understand how to prepare… please email me at info@survabumi.com

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WALITEIN Preparation

Preparing WALITEIN for your swiftlet farm:

Step 1: To prepare the 1.2kg of powder, boil 6 litres of water.

Step 2: Prepare 6 litres of boiling water (do not use just warm water) and pour it into a pail. Mix the boiling water with the small packet of powder that comes in a separate plastic bag shown below.
WALITEIN - Small Powder Pack

Step 3: Pour the entire 1.2kg of WALITEIN into a plastic tray measuring approximately 40cm x 30cm. Pour the hot mixture of powder and hot water previously into the tray of WALITEIN and mix thoroughly until mixture is porridge-like. Ensure that the mixture is not too ‘thick’ so that it does not harden when it’s placed within bird nest farm later. The mixture should be about 2-3 centrimetres in depth.

Step 4: Allow mixture to cool-off naturally before placing the trays inside your bird nest farm. You should see flying insects hatching from these porridge-like mixtures within 7-10 days.

Step 5: Place the trays near the entrance of your swiftlet farm to allow some light on the WALITEIN trays. Best to also place the trays in close vicinity to each other so that the concentrated flying insects can attract the swiftlets more easily.

Swiftlet Farming - WALITEIN Swiftlet Food Preparation

Swiftlet Farming - WALITEIN Swiftlet Food Preparation

Swiftlet Farming - WALITEIN Swiftlet Food Preparation

Swiftlet Farming - WALITEIN Swiftlet Food Preparation

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WALITEIN in Action

Here are a few pictures showing how Walitein is breeding these flying insects which is the swiftlet’s favorite diet. It has proven that after adding Walitein to the bird nest farm, mother swiftlets are able to harvest food for their newborns nearer to the nest and ensuring a higher survival rate of these chicks.

walitein-food-for-swiflets-01

walitein-food-for-swiflets-02

These new food sources can also be a good baits for wild swiftlets.

walitein-food-for-swiflets-03

walitein-food-for-swiflets-04

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WALITEIN – Swiftlet Food for Your Swiftlet Farm

After years of research and experiments with actual swiftlet farming methodologies, we’ve managed to produce the remedy that can help reduce the mortality of baby swiftlets which can cause productivity of bird nest to stagnate. This product is named ‘WALITEIN’ and it has been very effective in helping the growth and production of insects that are considered staple food to swiftlets.

WALITEIN - Food for Swiftlet Farming

Step 1: Pour the entire 1.2kg of WALITEIN into a plastic tray measuring approximately 40cm x 30cm.

Step 2: Pour in 6 litres of boiling water (do not use just warm water) into the plastic tray and mix thoroughly until mixture is porridge-like. The mixture should be about 2-3 centrimetres in depth.

Step 3: Allow mixture to cool-off naturally before locating the trays inside your bird nest.

Step 4: Place the trays near the entrance of your swiftlet farm to allow some light on the WALITEIN trays. Best to also place the trays in close vicinity to each other to attract the swiftlets easily.

International Shipping Rates:

Cambodia

(15 Working Days)

Bottles
WALITEIN
Shipping
Fee (RM)
Total
1
37.90
38.00
75.90
2
75.80
57.00
132.80
3
113.70
78.00
191.70
4
151.60
98.00
249.60
5
189.50
118.00
307.50
6
225.13
139.00
364.13
7
261.32
159.00
420.32
8
297.14
180.00
477.14
9
332.57
200.00
532.57
10
367.63
220.00
587.63
 

Indonesia

(14-30 Working Days)

Bottles
WALITEIN
Shipping
Fee (RM)
Total
1
37.90
45.00
82.90
2
75.80
53.00
128.80
3
113.70
72.00
185.70
4
151.60
92.00
243.60
5
189.50
112.00
301.50
6
225.13
131.00
356.13
7
261.32
151.00
412.32
8
297.14
171.00
468.14
9
332.57
191.00
523.57
10
367.63
211.00
578.63
 

Singapore

7 working days

Bottles
WALITEIN
Shipping
Fee (RM)
Total
1
37.90
22.30
60.20
2
75.80
29.10
104.90
3
113.70
35.90
149.60
4
151.60
42.70
194.30
5
189.50
49.50
239.00
6
225.13
56.30
281.43
7
261.32
63.10
324.42
8
297.14
69.90
367.04
9
332.57
76.70
409.27
10
367.63
83.50
451.13

Goods will be sent via POS Malaysia’s Express Mail Service (EMS).

For ordering enquiries, please contact +6012.225.6664 or email birdnestfarm@yahoo.com

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Introducing Grade AAA Bird Nest

Okie, for lack of a better name, I decided to call my new line of bird nest product Grade AAA.

GRADE AAA refers to cleaned and packed bird nest. I assure you that my bird nest products has not been contaminated with any bleaching agents nor chemicals. All our bird nests are hand-picked for feathers and foreign artifacts so that you enjoy the highest quality bird nest produce.

I want you to enjoy the bird nest without any worries and to come back to us again in the future. I believe that if you are satisfied with our bird nest products, you will come back and buy from me again.

Let’s get back to business now, here’s the current price for my products (all prices quoted in USD):

1) Grade AAA = $3,100 (MYR 9,800)

2) Grade A = $2,125 (MYR 6,800)

3) Grade B = $1,810 (MYR 5,800)

4) Grade C = $1,440 (MYR 4,600)

Prices may fluctuate according to supply and demand.

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Rising investments in swiftlet farming boost Malaysia’s bird nest exports

Stories By ERROL OH

ALL businesses are built on blood, sweat and tears, at least in the figurative sense. But one industry thrives on another bodily fluid – saliva. Bird saliva, that is. And not just any bird. It has to be the swiftlet, whose nests of hardened spit have been a delicacy treasured by the Chinese for centuries.

Depending on the quality, marketplace and timing, a kilogramme of unprocessed edible bird nest can fetch a few thousand ringgit.

The processing, a tedious and labour-intensive affair, typically doubles the value of the nests. Quoting a senior Sabah government official, a news report early last month says bird nest is sold at RM4,000 to RM18,000 per kg.

The global market is said to be worth billions of ringgit. Thanks to its head start of 20 years or so in swiftlet farming on a commercial scale, Indonesia supplies 70% to 80% of the bird nests consumed worldwide, mainly in Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, Macau, Singapore and North America.

Heng believes swiftlet farming is a great investment opportunity.

However, swiftlet farming is an increasingly visible business in Malaysia. Given the high rate of innovation and adoption here, there is a good chance of Malaysia growing its current market share of about 10%.

(Some people use the words ranching or breeding instead of farming. Actually, none is accurate because the operators merely provide a nesting environment for the birds, which come and go freely. Perhaps a more appropriate term is swiftlet hosting.)

Dr Christopher Lim, a nephrologist who has succeeded as a part-time swiftlet farmer and has authored a how-to book on the subject, says there are about 22,000 swiftlet farms (also known as swiftlet hotels, swiftlet houses or birdhouses) in Malaysia. He estimates that there are 200 new ones every month.

This explains the increasing frequency of complaints from residents and business owners about birdhouses in their neighbourhoods.

If you happen to be near swiftlet farms, it will not take you long to notice them. You will hear loud, piercing chirps filling the sky. This comes from CDs that are played to attract the birds. And if you look around, you are likely to spot windowless buildings (usually shophouses) that have been renovated or built to host feathered occupants.

Birdhouse boom

The list of towns that have become known for this activity is lengthening. There are such places in just about every state. What these towns usually have in common are proximity to agricultural and forest land, and relatively low levels of industrial activity.

The first element is important because farms, plantations and jungles support the swiftlets’ diet of flying insects. The lack of factories in the vicinity matters because air pollution is anathema to the birds.

You can find many swiftlet farms in Perak (in Sitiawan, Ipoh, Teluk Intan and Taiping, for example), Pahang (Kuantan, Rompin, Pekan), Kelantan (Kota Baru, Tumpat), Terengganu (Kuala Terengganu, Kuala Besut) and Kedah (Sungai Petani).

Even the more developed states, such as Selangor, Johor and Penang have their share of areas that have attracted investments in swiftlet farming.

Mohammad says guidelines on acceptable practices in swiftlet farming are available.

Mohammad says guidelines on acceptable practices in swiftlet farming are available.

Until recently, the industry in Malaysia had maintained a low profile. The operators that were doing well were unwilling to share information and knowledge. The secrets to profitable swiftlet farming stayed within a tight circle and this was a major barrier to entry.

Still, there is no holding back the desire to make money. Despite the lack of transparency, the trickle of newcomers had eventually led to a critical mass that kicked the doors wide open some five years ago.

The key attraction here is the lure of lucrative returns from a passive investment. The idea is simple – put up a well-designed and well-equipped swiftlet farm at the right spot, and the rest will fall in place. The birds will come and soon, you can keep harvesting their nests for many years.

“It’s a gold mine,” says Mohammad Azimullah, manager of Swiftlets Venture International (SVI), a consultancy outfit.

“You put in RM500,000 and if your location is good, you can net RM1mil a year within four years. Where else in the world can you find such a business?”

Kelvin Heng of Pearlnest, which does trading and consulting work, is convinced that swiftlet farming is currently the best investment opportunity in Malaysia.

He explains: “You invest only once. You don’t have to come out with money every month to pay maintenance and workers’ salaries. If the farm is successful, you can collect thousands of ringgit every month.”

On a wing and a prayer

From the Birdhouse to the Bowl

There are, of course, a lot of ifs and buts to deal within this fledgeling industry. A lot of people have rushed into it and many of them have crashed and burned.

Lim reckons that about 80% of the birdhouses in Malaysia are failed projects.

Mohammad of SVI has a slightly different take. He says the failure rate is 60%, but adds that of the rest, half are considered only marginally successful.

The concept of swiftlet farming is uncomplicated, but the execution is technically challenging if the farmers do not understand what makes the birds tick.

Birdnest Processing

Many parameters determine the suitability of a farm’s location, and these include food availability, weather and geographical conditions, and nearby industrial activities.

The design of the birdhouse can be equally tricky. In the wild, swiftlets nest in caves. So, the idea is to simulate a cave environment, which means temperature, lighting, humidity, smell and space are often make-or-break features.

In addition, well-designed birdhouses make it easy for the swiftlets to fly in and out and to nest. They should also be built in such a way so as to protect the birds from predators and to minimise antagonising the neighbours.

The last objective is crucial because many times, the local authorities have shut down swiftlet farming operations following objections from other rate-payers.

A common problem is the noise from the birdcall recordings. Lim blames this on the farmers’ ignorance.

“If you know how to properly design and run the farms, the neighbours won’t be bothered by the sounds. You want to attract birds, not humans,” he argues.

Heng of Pearlnest agrees: “The farmers turn up the volume like it’s karaoke. You have to be considerate. And you don’t have to play the sound the whole day. There’s no point in that anyway.”

SVI’s Mohammad points out that the Veterinary Services Department and some local authorities have already come up with guidelines on acceptable practices in swiftlet farming. Therefore, the best way for swiftlet farmers to safeguard their investments is to just stick to the rules.

He says: “People should go for purpose-built birdhouses. We never recommend building birdhouses in shophouses.” He foresees that in 10 years, the practice of converting shophouses into bird farms will be outlawed.

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Mukah: Bird Nest Farming Challenges

MUKAH (SARAWAK): Mukah, a sleepy hollow that can be reached by land via a two-and-a-half hour journey from Sibu, has had very few economic activities.

This scenario has changed with the massive migration of burung walit or swiftlets from Indonesia due to the La Nina meteorological phenomenon and immense forest fires in the republic in the early years of the new millennium.

The view inside a bird-nest building in Mukah.

Full of birds: The view inside a bird-nest building in Mukah.

Real estate values in Mukah and its fringing areas have shot up while the top floors of shophouses and commercial buildings in this town have been turned into homes for these birds.

“Previously, getting RM30,000 for the top floor of a shophouse here was remote. Since the arrival of the swiftlets, offers came in as high as RM200,000,” said bird nest entrepreneur John Low here.

On Oct 13, 2005, the Government lifted restrictions on bird-nest trading apart from acknowledging that the venture had the potential to boost the incomes of locals.

Bird-nest entrepreneurs in other states are required to obtain the nod from the local authorities before creating homes for the birds to safeguard the environment the interests of residents.

However, on Oct 14, Sarawak Forestry Department rangers demolished two bird-nest premises in Medan Setiaraya and New Township Mukah, creating a predicament for bird-nest businessmen.

Mukah Birdnest Association chairman Philip Tiong said the rangers not only demolished the premises but also seized bird nests and killed young swiftlets.

This happened even though the swiftlets were a protected species, he said.

“We want the state to consider issuing permits and guidelines for us,” said Tiong, who called on Chief Minister Tan Sri Abdul Taib Mahmud to intervene on the issue.

Tiong said, if state authorities were adamant on blanketing out the bird-nest industry, many entrepreneurs, including the 150 members of the association, would be out of business.

Meanwhile, Sarawak Assistant Minister for Planning and Resource Management, Mohd Naroden Majais, was reported to have said that the bird-nest industry came under the Wildlife Protection Ordinance 1998, Wildlife Protection (Edible Bird Nests) Rules 1998 and Wildlife Protection Rules 1998.

It is all right if the birds live in their natural habitat, like inside caves, but they are not allowed in urban areas.

A check by Bernama here found that the swiftlet buildings were clean and free of noise like other premises in the town.

However, the calmness disappears at sundown when the swiftlets return in the tens of thousands to their nests.

This writer was given the opportunity to check a building used to house thousands of swiftlets and found that it was clean, well kept and had good ventilation.

“We adhere to guidelines drawn by the Veterinary Department,” Tiong said, referring to the department’s Good Animal Husbandry Practices (GAHP) certificate.

The certificate is one of the requirements for one to be allowed to venture into the bird-nest industry in Sarawak.

Clearance is also needed from the Wildlife Protection Department, Land Survey Department and local authorities.

Industry sources said the GAHP certificate ensured the industry was well managed apart from preventing infectious diseases like bird flu.

A swiftlet building its nest in one of the premises.

Good income: A swiftlet building its nest in one of the premises.

Last July 5, Housing and Local Government Minister Datuk Seri Ong Ka Chuan said the rearing of swiftlets was allowed at commercial premises and shophouses but not in housing estates.

Trade in bird nests began more than a century ago with the first recorded harvesting carried out at the Niah Caves in Sarawak in 1878.

Indonesia is the first nation to carry out trade in bird nests due to the immense value of the commodity.

There are 10,000 buildings used as swiftlet ranches nationwide, producing 12 tonnes of bird nests a month.

Unprocessed bird nests fetch an average price of RM4,000 per kg. This means the industry is capable of generating RM48mil in turnover a month.

“The price is 10 times higher after the material is processed and graded for export”, said an industry source who wished not to be named.

The industry is not limited to Mukah. Major towns like Kuching, Bintulu, Sarikei and Sibu are alos involved.

“The swiftlets benefit urban dwellers and villagers who lease their land to bird-nest businessmen for up to RM700 a month,” said a caretaker of a swiftlet ranch who wished to be named only as Fadhil.

Civil servant Khalil Ali, who invested RM30,000 on bird-nest premises at his family-owned land in Kampung Oyak, Mukah, called for the Sarawak government to solve the confusion over the industry.

Despite the state’s move to set up five swiftlet eco-parks, including two in Daro and Mukah, the bird-nest issue should be viewed objectively.

The state has to think of ways to transfer the birds to their new homes without having to demolish some 1,500 premises or culling tens of thousands of the protected species.

“We want our shoplots to be legalised. Allow us the same rights as accorded to bird-nest entrepreneurs in the Peninsula,” said Low.

To date, the authorities have issued licences for only two bird-nest premises. — Bernama

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Bird Nest Farm Designs

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

Picture of bird nest farm's rooftop design

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Bird Nest Farm Designs

Here are a few pictures taken from our bird nest farm in Indonesia.

A sample of bird nest farm's ceiling design.

A sample of bird nest farm's ceiling design.

A sample of bird nest farm's ceiling design.

A sample of bird nest farm's design.

Sample of bird nest farm's ceiling design.

Sample of bird nest farm's ceiling design.

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Indonesia Bird Nest Farm

Here are a few pictures showing the exterior designs of our Indonesia’s bird nest farms.

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Exterior Design

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Exterior Design

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Back Windows

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Back Windows

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Window Entrance

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Window Entrance

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Rooftop Entrance

Indonesia Bird Nest Farm - Rooftop Entrance

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